2 replaced http://math.stackexchange.com/ with https://math.stackexchange.com/
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I've developed a method for quantifying "uniformity" that allows you to do what you are asking. Its helped out a couple other folks too.

See: http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/921084/how-to-calculate-peakiness-or-uniformity-in-histogram/921110#921110https://math.stackexchange.com/questions/921084/how-to-calculate-peakiness-or-uniformity-in-histogram/921110#921110

Basically, you are just calculating the path length of the associated CDF by connecting consecutive points by a straight line.

I've developed a method for quantifying "uniformity" that allows you to do what you are asking. Its helped out a couple other folks too.

See: http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/921084/how-to-calculate-peakiness-or-uniformity-in-histogram/921110#921110

Basically, you are just calculating the path length of the associated CDF by connecting consecutive points by a straight line.

I've developed a method for quantifying "uniformity" that allows you to do what you are asking. Its helped out a couple other folks too.

See: https://math.stackexchange.com/questions/921084/how-to-calculate-peakiness-or-uniformity-in-histogram/921110#921110

Basically, you are just calculating the path length of the associated CDF by connecting consecutive points by a straight line.

1
source | link

I've developed a method for quantifying "uniformity" that allows you to do what you are asking. Its helped out a couple other folks too.

See: http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/921084/how-to-calculate-peakiness-or-uniformity-in-histogram/921110#921110

Basically, you are just calculating the path length of the associated CDF by connecting consecutive points by a straight line.