2 several small tweaks; please check meaning is preserved
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ifIf the water content is homogenioushomogeneous in the 300-kg kg product, then there is no variance and the measured water content applies to the whole 300-kg kg product. if If the water content is not homogenioushomogeneous, a single 15-kg kg sample taken from one place tells you nothing about the variance over the entire product. if

If the distribution of water is random across the product, you could take multiple samples -, say 15 1-kg kg samples (n=15$n=15$) from different parts of the product, which we now define as 300 1-kg kg portions. measureMeasure the percent water in each sample, compute thetheir mean and the std dev of the as xbar and sstandard deviation $s$, and compute the stdevstandard deviation of the sampling distribution as (s/sqrt(n))*FPF$(s/\sqrt{n})$ FPF where FPF =, the finite population factor = sqrt((N-n)/(N-1)) where N=finite, is $\sqrt{(N-n)/(N-1)}$ and $N$, the finite population size =, is 300 1-kg chunks of 1 kg. if

If the water content is not homogenioushomogeneous but patterned -, as in fat in a hog carcass -, then the mean water content can be estimated from the water content of a single sample taken from a specific location and the known pattern.

if the water content is homogenious in the 300-kg product then there is no variance and the measured water content applies to the whole 300-kg product. if the water content is not homogenious, a single 15-kg sample taken from one place tells you nothing about the variance over the entire product. if the distribution of water is random across the product, you could take multiple samples - say 15 1-kg samples (n=15) from different parts of the product which we now define as 300 1-kg portions. measure the percent water in each sample, compute the mean and the std dev of the as xbar and s, and compute the stdev of the sampling distribution as (s/sqrt(n))*FPF where FPF = finite population factor = sqrt((N-n)/(N-1)) where N=finite population size = 300 1-kg chunks. if the water content is not homogenious but patterned - as in fat in a hog carcass - then the mean water content can be estimated from the water content of a single sample taken from a specific location and the known pattern.

If the water content is homogeneous in the 300 kg product, then there is no variance and the measured water content applies to the whole 300 kg product. If the water content is not homogeneous, a single 15 kg sample taken from one place tells you nothing about the variance over the entire product.

If the distribution of water is random across the product, you could take multiple samples, say 15 1 kg samples ($n=15$) from different parts of the product, which we now define as 300 1 kg portions. Measure the percent water in each sample, compute their mean and standard deviation $s$, and compute the standard deviation of the sampling distribution as $(s/\sqrt{n})$ FPF where FPF, the finite population factor, is $\sqrt{(N-n)/(N-1)}$ and $N$, the finite population size, is 300 chunks of 1 kg.

If the water content is not homogeneous but patterned, as in fat in a hog carcass, then the mean water content can be estimated from the water content of a single sample taken from a specific location and the known pattern.

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if the water content is homogenious in the 300-kg product then there is no variance and the measured water content applies to the whole 300-kg product. if the water content is not homogenious, a single 15-kg sample taken from one place tells you nothing about the variance over the entire product. if the distribution of water is random across the product, you could take multiple samples - say 15 1-kg samples (n=15) from different parts of the product which we now define as 300 1-kg portions. measure the percent water in each sample, compute the mean and the std dev of the as xbar and s, and compute the stdev of the sampling distribution as (s/sqrt(n))*FPF where FPF = finite population factor = sqrt((N-n)/(N-1)) where N=finite population size = 300 1-kg chunks. if the water content is not homogenious but patterned - as in fat in a hog carcass - then the mean water content can be estimated from the water content of a single sample taken from a specific location and the known pattern.