3 replaced http://stats.stackexchange.com/ with https://stats.stackexchange.com/
source | link

One solution that we've kicked around at the office is to just alter the troublesome points. This can take the form of straight-up deletion or something more sophisticated. Essentially, the observation is that close-by points are highly redundant: in fact, so redundant that they reduce the rank of the covariance matrix. By the same token, one point is contributing little information to the problem at hand anyway, so removing one or the other (or doing something else, like averaging them or "bouncing" one point away from the other to some minimal acceptable distance) will not really change your solution all that much.

I'm not sure how to judge at what point the two points become "too close." Perhaps this could be a tuning option left to the user.

(Oops! After I posted this, I found your question hereyour question here which advances this answer to a much more elaborate solution. I hope that by linking to it from my answer, I'll be helping with SEO...)

One solution that we've kicked around at the office is to just alter the troublesome points. This can take the form of straight-up deletion or something more sophisticated. Essentially, the observation is that close-by points are highly redundant: in fact, so redundant that they reduce the rank of the covariance matrix. By the same token, one point is contributing little information to the problem at hand anyway, so removing one or the other (or doing something else, like averaging them or "bouncing" one point away from the other to some minimal acceptable distance) will not really change your solution all that much.

I'm not sure how to judge at what point the two points become "too close." Perhaps this could be a tuning option left to the user.

(Oops! After I posted this, I found your question here which advances this answer to a much more elaborate solution. I hope that by linking to it from my answer, I'll be helping with SEO...)

One solution that we've kicked around at the office is to just alter the troublesome points. This can take the form of straight-up deletion or something more sophisticated. Essentially, the observation is that close-by points are highly redundant: in fact, so redundant that they reduce the rank of the covariance matrix. By the same token, one point is contributing little information to the problem at hand anyway, so removing one or the other (or doing something else, like averaging them or "bouncing" one point away from the other to some minimal acceptable distance) will not really change your solution all that much.

I'm not sure how to judge at what point the two points become "too close." Perhaps this could be a tuning option left to the user.

(Oops! After I posted this, I found your question here which advances this answer to a much more elaborate solution. I hope that by linking to it from my answer, I'll be helping with SEO...)

2 added 300 characters in body
source | link

One solution that we've kicked around at the office is to just alter the troublesome points. This can take the form of straight-up deletion or something more sophisticated. Essentially, the observation is that close-by points are highly redundant: in fact, so redundant that they reduce the rank of the covariance matrix. By the same token, one point is contributing little information to the problem at hand anyway, so removing one or the other (or doing something else, like averaging them or "bouncing" one point away from the other to some minimal acceptable distance) will not really change your solution all that much.

I'm not sure how to judge at what point the two points become "too close." Perhaps this could be a tuning option left to the user.

(Oops! After I posted this, I found your question here which advances this answer to a much more elaborate solution. I hope that by linking to it from my answer, I'll be helping with SEO...)

One solution that we've kicked around at the office is to just alter the troublesome points. This can take the form of straight-up deletion or something more sophisticated. Essentially, the observation is that close-by points are highly redundant: in fact, so redundant that they reduce the rank of the covariance matrix. By the same token, one point is contributing little information to the problem at hand anyway, so removing one or the other (or doing something else, like averaging them or "bouncing" one point away from the other to some minimal acceptable distance) will not really change your solution all that much.

I'm not sure how to judge at what point the two points become "too close." Perhaps this could be a tuning option left to the user.

One solution that we've kicked around at the office is to just alter the troublesome points. This can take the form of straight-up deletion or something more sophisticated. Essentially, the observation is that close-by points are highly redundant: in fact, so redundant that they reduce the rank of the covariance matrix. By the same token, one point is contributing little information to the problem at hand anyway, so removing one or the other (or doing something else, like averaging them or "bouncing" one point away from the other to some minimal acceptable distance) will not really change your solution all that much.

I'm not sure how to judge at what point the two points become "too close." Perhaps this could be a tuning option left to the user.

(Oops! After I posted this, I found your question here which advances this answer to a much more elaborate solution. I hope that by linking to it from my answer, I'll be helping with SEO...)

1
source | link

One solution that we've kicked around at the office is to just alter the troublesome points. This can take the form of straight-up deletion or something more sophisticated. Essentially, the observation is that close-by points are highly redundant: in fact, so redundant that they reduce the rank of the covariance matrix. By the same token, one point is contributing little information to the problem at hand anyway, so removing one or the other (or doing something else, like averaging them or "bouncing" one point away from the other to some minimal acceptable distance) will not really change your solution all that much.

I'm not sure how to judge at what point the two points become "too close." Perhaps this could be a tuning option left to the user.