We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
3 added 32 characters in body
source | link

The traditional approach is likely to work better, not because it is particularly briliantbrilliant but because the inverted approach is worse.

TheMy main problemconcern with the inverted approachlatter is that the students who have poor statistics skills andrather limited understanding from beforeof and skills in statistics (I expect the vast majority of my students to be like that) may get pretty confused by havingnot be able to effectively study a large topic (25% of the whole course at once) from A to Z on their ownindependently. Reading the textbook unassisted may be overwhelming. They may answer the questions and do the exercises if they are forced to (through mandatory homework) but they may still have a hard time understanding the essence and what they have done in solving the exercises. In fact, they may get so confused by independent study of a large topic that the classroom explanation following their independent learningthat follows may not be all that effective in "deconfusing" them.

They alsoMy second concern is, the students do not get to practice independent problem solving afterafter the class, so they do not get to strengthen their understanding following the class.

The traditional approach is likely to work better, not because it is particularly briliant but because the inverted approach is worse.

The main problem with the inverted approach is that the students who have poor statistics skills and understanding from before may get pretty confused by having to study a large topic (25% of the whole course at once) from A to Z on their own. Reading the textbook unassisted may be overwhelming. They may answer the questions and do the exercises if they are forced to (through mandatory homework) but they may still have a hard time understanding the essence and what they have done in solving the exercises. In fact, they may get so confused by independent study of a large topic that the classroom explanation following their independent learning may not be all that effective in "deconfusing" them.

They also do not get to practice independent problem solving after the class so they do not get to strengthen their understanding following the class.

The traditional approach is likely to work better, not because it is particularly brilliant but because the inverted approach is worse.

My main concern with the latter is that students who have rather limited understanding of and skills in statistics (I expect the vast majority of my students to be like that) may not be able to effectively study a large topic (25% of the whole course at once) independently. Reading the textbook unassisted may be overwhelming. They may answer the questions and do the exercises if they are forced to (through mandatory homework) but they may still have a hard time understanding the essence and what they have done in solving the exercises. In fact, they may get so confused by independent study of a large topic that the classroom explanation that follows may not be all that effective in "deconfusing" them.

My second concern is, the students do not get to practice independent problem solving after the class, so they do not get to strengthen their understanding following the class.

    Post Made Community Wiki by whuber
2 added 34 characters in body
source | link

The traditional approach is likely to work better, not because it is particularly briliant but because the inverted approach is worse.

The main problem with the inverted approach is that the students who have poor statistics skills and understanding from before may get pretty confused by having to study a large topic (25% of the whole course at once) from A to Z on their own. Reading the textbook unassisted may be overwhelming. They may answer the questions and do the exercises if they are forced to (through mandatory homework) but they may still have a hard time understanding the essence and what they have done in solving the exercises. In fact, they may get so confused by independent study of a large topic that the classroom explanation following their independent learning may not be all that effective in "deconfusing" them.

They also do not get to practice independent problem solving after the class so they do not get to strengthen their understanding following the class.

The traditional approach is likely to work better, not because it is particularly briliant but because the inverted approach is worse.

The main problem with the inverted approach is that the students who have poor statistics skills and understanding from before may get pretty confused by having to study a large topic from A to Z on their own. Reading the textbook unassisted may be overwhelming. They may answer the questions and do the exercises if they are forced to (through mandatory homework) but they may still have a hard time understanding the essence and what they have done in solving the exercises. In fact, they may get so confused by independent study of a large topic that the classroom explanation following their independent learning may not be all that effective in "deconfusing" them.

They also do not get to practice independent problem solving after the class so they do not get to strengthen their understanding following the class.

The traditional approach is likely to work better, not because it is particularly briliant but because the inverted approach is worse.

The main problem with the inverted approach is that the students who have poor statistics skills and understanding from before may get pretty confused by having to study a large topic (25% of the whole course at once) from A to Z on their own. Reading the textbook unassisted may be overwhelming. They may answer the questions and do the exercises if they are forced to (through mandatory homework) but they may still have a hard time understanding the essence and what they have done in solving the exercises. In fact, they may get so confused by independent study of a large topic that the classroom explanation following their independent learning may not be all that effective in "deconfusing" them.

They also do not get to practice independent problem solving after the class so they do not get to strengthen their understanding following the class.

1
source | link

The traditional approach is likely to work better, not because it is particularly briliant but because the inverted approach is worse.

The main problem with the inverted approach is that the students who have poor statistics skills and understanding from before may get pretty confused by having to study a large topic from A to Z on their own. Reading the textbook unassisted may be overwhelming. They may answer the questions and do the exercises if they are forced to (through mandatory homework) but they may still have a hard time understanding the essence and what they have done in solving the exercises. In fact, they may get so confused by independent study of a large topic that the classroom explanation following their independent learning may not be all that effective in "deconfusing" them.

They also do not get to practice independent problem solving after the class so they do not get to strengthen their understanding following the class.