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Rejecting a null is the same thing as achieving significance. If you understand "how to use confidence intervals to reject a null hypothesis", you've already done the other thing.

In short, if the interval for $\mu_x-\mu_y$ doesn't include zero, your reject the null; equivalently you have achieved significance, thereby concluding $\mu_x > \mu_y$

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Rejecting a null is the same thing as achieving significance. If you understand "how to use confidence intervals to reject a null hypothesis", you've already done the other thing.

In short, if the interval for $\mu_x-\mu_y$ doesn't include zero, your reject the null; equivalently you have achieved significance, thereby concluding $\mu_x > \mu_y$

Rejecting a null is the same thing as achieving significance. If you understand "how to use confidence intervals to reject a null hypothesis", you've already done the other thing.

In short, if the interval for $\mu_x-\mu_y$ doesn't include zero, your reject the null; equivalently you have achieved significance, thereby concluding $\mu_x > \mu_y$

enter image description here

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source | link

Rejecting a null is the same thing as achieving significance. If you understand "how to use confidence intervals to reject a null hypothesis", you've already done the other thing.

In short, if the interval for $\mu_x-\mu_y$ doesn't include zero, your reject the null; equivalently you have achieved significance, thereby concluding $\mu_x > \mu_y$