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An experiment about the review process was made. Participants were students visiting a course. One group had to solve some exercises and the other group had to review their work and give feedback.

At the end, an exam for both groups was held. Exam grades for every participant were collected (aggregated to a score between 0 and 100%).

Which statistical method could be used to prove the hypothesis that says that reviewers learn more than people being reviewed?

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  • $\begingroup$ So are the people in the reviewer group are each exposed to a particular person in the reviewed group, & each person in the reviewed group was exposed to a particular person in the reviewer group? $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 16, 2015 at 18:04
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, that is the case. $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 16, 2015 at 18:09
  • $\begingroup$ Were the participants randomly assigned to the revewer vs reviewed groups? $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 16, 2015 at 18:16
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, they were. $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 16, 2015 at 18:17

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Because these are test scores (bounded, etc.), it may be best not to assume normality and homogeneity of variance. In addition, your groups are non-independent in an interesting way. With these facts in mind, given that you want to compare two groups, I might try the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Each matched reviewer-reviewee would be a pair. In essence, you are testing to see if one tends to score higher than the other. This should be available in most standard statistical software. For example, in R you could use ?wilcox.test(, paired=TRUE).

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