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I am trying to visualise the size of the impact of different activities (A,B,C,D etc.) that improve (reduce the size of) a certain situation. Some of the activities (e.g. B and C) overlap with other activities (e.g. A) in their impact. That is, one activity´s impact is reduced by another activity as both impact the same situation.

I planned to visualise this with a treemap. But it seems that software automatically generating treemaps cannot display more than one layer (see diagram attached). Therefore, I thought a Venn diagram might be most suitable. But I read in another question posted here that only very few sets of data can be displayed in Venn diagrams. However, I want to display around 20 activities (and in this case circles) in one diagram, some of them intersecting, some not.

Is anyone familiar with a software for Venn diagrams that is able to display relatively large sets of data (or different layers in treemaps)? Or does somebody have an entirely different approach to the visualisation of my data?

I very much appreciate helpful comments, ideas and experiences! Size of impact of activities vs remaining size

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  • $\begingroup$ How about making a matrix, with A,B,C for rows and A,B,C for columns, and then some sort of symbol describing the "impact" measure between them? Something like in this answer. $\endgroup$
    – Andy W
    Commented Apr 16, 2015 at 12:21
  • $\begingroup$ It will be useful if you could post here some plot that has been generated to give a clearer picture of the problems. $\endgroup$
    – rnso
    Commented Apr 16, 2015 at 12:42
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for your comments. I added a treemap diagram, on which the impact areas and the areas in the size of the overlaps are displayed on one layer. This might be a bit of a less problem if I was able to place the overlaps correctly (which would be e.g. for overlap "S o" between the activities of "s" and "o"). But, I cannot do this manually and so far, I havent figured out how to order the data to do it automatically. I hope this makes my problem a bit clearer. I am working on a Venn diagram. $\endgroup$
    – Ramona
    Commented Apr 17, 2015 at 13:36
  • $\begingroup$ Concerning the matrix-idea: thanks for that! However, I am afraid that this falls short of what I want to visualise, as I do not only want to show the relation between variables (overlaps), but also their sizes (which might still be possible in a matrix) and the relation of their sizes to the size which is remaining after the activities were undertaken. Additionally, I have around 150 variables, in different sub-sets, which also overlap in some cases, so in a matrix it might be difficult to display it clearly. $\endgroup$
    – Ramona
    Commented Apr 17, 2015 at 13:46

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How about making a matrix, with A,B,C for rows and A,B,C for columns, and then some sort of symbol describing the "impact" measure between them? Something like in this answer.

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    $\begingroup$ I've copied this comment by @AndyW as a community wiki answer because the comment is, more or less, an answer to this question. We have a dramatic gap between answers and questions. At least part of the problem is that some questions are answered in comments: if comments which answered the question were answers instead, we would have fewer unanswered questions. $\endgroup$
    – mkt
    Commented Jun 20, 2019 at 12:50

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