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For $n = 5, 10, 20, 100$ we have quintiles, deciles, vigintiles, and percentiles. Is there a name for $n = 50$?

A candidate would be quinquagintiles, but I can't find that having being used.

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    $\begingroup$ Note that $n$ here does not mean sample size, but the number of intervals into which a distribution is divided.There are $4$ quintiles (point values) dividing a distribution into $5$ parts with (notionally) equal frequencies of values in each. On the question: I have never seen a specific term for this set in statistical discussions.. You are talking about about every other percentile. $\endgroup$
    – Nick Cox
    Commented May 24, 2015 at 8:54

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Why do you need a specific term? Can't you just describe it with words and numbers? I have never seen a term for this, and hope never to see one, it is not needed.

Your term vigintile seem to exist, but I have never seen it "in the wild".

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    $\begingroup$ Indeed, if there is a word for it, most people won't know it, making it a poor choice to communicate anything useful. If a paper was talking about something in the 49th "50-quantile" (whatever the term would be), I'd shake my head at the fact that they were too pretentious to just call it the 98th percentile. $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 29, 2021 at 17:50
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    $\begingroup$ Although it's hard to prove a term does not exist, the crowd-sourced Wiktionary entry about quantile names has nothing between "vigintile" and "centile", lending support to this negative answer. Moreover, if there were a term, most likely it would be modeled on the Latin ordinals and be called a "quinquagintile" (as in the Q), but this term gets only tentative search hits. E.g., "If there are 50 bins, each bin should be termed a 'quinquagintile', according to our Latin dictionary." K. Anderson and C. Brooks (2005). The Extremes of the P/E Effect. $\endgroup$
    – whuber
    Commented Jan 29, 2021 at 18:18
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    $\begingroup$ stats.stackexchange.com/questions/235330/… is the fullest list I know and includes "vigintile". Knowing some Latin or Greek doesn't necessarily make you pretentious, but I share the view that we don't need different terms just for different subsets of quantiles. I must add "hexadecile" but it appears predated by "suboctile". $\endgroup$
    – Nick Cox
    Commented Jan 29, 2021 at 18:19

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