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I am very new to statistics and R, and hence I might be asking very silly questions.

rnorm() function gives me standard normal random variables with a mean of 0 and a standard deviation of 1. Do these variables belong to x-axis or y-axis of normal distribution graph?

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  • $\begingroup$ Side note: R is not a tool, it is a complete software. $\endgroup$
    – user81847
    Commented Dec 14, 2015 at 7:01
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    $\begingroup$ What's a "normal distribution graph"? An ecdf? a QQ plot? a histogram? something else? $\endgroup$
    – Glen_b
    Commented Dec 14, 2015 at 13:42

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x axis. The rnorm function returns simulated values from a rv with a normal distribution, given the mean an sd parameters.

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  • $\begingroup$ what is this RV? $\endgroup$
    – Onki
    Commented Dec 14, 2015 at 6:54
  • $\begingroup$ rv = Random Variable $\endgroup$
    – toneloy
    Commented Dec 14, 2015 at 6:55
  • $\begingroup$ What's the rationale here? There is no connection here between the answer and the definition of rnorm(). I see no reason why a normal distribution should not be plotted any way you want, so the variable in question could be on the y axis when we are seeing it as a response, on the x axis if plotted in a conventional histogram, etc., etc. $\endgroup$
    – Nick Cox
    Commented Dec 14, 2015 at 13:43
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    $\begingroup$ Because he is talking about de density/distribution function. When you ploy these functions, in the x axis, you have the variable, in the y axis you have density/probability $\endgroup$
    – toneloy
    Commented Dec 14, 2015 at 13:47
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    $\begingroup$ Yes, you can plot a function anyway you want, but in literature, you will always find the variable in the x axis in a density/distribution function. He is new to statistics. At least for me, that means that when he says "normal distribution graph" he has a Gaussian bell in mind. Anyway, let he himself make this point clear. $\endgroup$
    – toneloy
    Commented Dec 14, 2015 at 14:29

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