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I'm working on some code profiling/optimization and I'm trying to find a way to visualize the result (a scalar -- the performance). I can specify a pretty big variety of options, some of which may be used together, some of which may not. For example, if I have options A, B, C, D, and E, I may have a result for A, A+B, A+C, A+B+C, D, D+B, D+B+C+E, ... etc etc.

To visualize it, I could just have a lookup table somewhere that maps a case name/integer to a combination of options and do a standard categorical scatter plot. But I don't like the idea of having to look up in a table the difference between Case 32 and Case 12.

What is an intuitive way to visualize the result as a function of the various combinations?

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Bertin graphs can be used to visualize the information (figure from a book as shown in an answer on gis.stackexchange): Bertin graphs .

Each row would represent a set of options, and each column a particular option (A, B, C, etc...). Each option present for given set of option will be marked in the matrix.

Then you can either plot results on the side (e.g., as a bar plot with one bar per row), or as vertically stacked figures if more than one result to display (one such figure per set of options). Reordering the rows and columns of the matrix is something you'll likely want to explore in order to highlight patterns of interest.

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