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I am looking through articles citing an article I'm reading - and I wish to judge how much that citing article is "important" or "good" by itself.

one way of knowing would be if I had known how "distinguished" that journal was. Which leads me to my question:

What measures are there (and where can I find them) for a journal "importance" or "impact"?

(I know of Impact Factor score. But I wonder if there are other such measures, and which are more applicable to statistical journals)

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    $\begingroup$ If your aim is to judge how much that citing article is "important" or "good" by itself, you could always try reading it... $\endgroup$ – onestop Aug 22 '10 at 7:47
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    $\begingroup$ Well, reading takes time and you may not even have the article available to begin with, so trying to estimate the relevance and quality vs time and maybe even money investment required is crucial. $\endgroup$ – user979 Aug 22 '10 at 10:40
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Anne-Wil Harzing has a useful site with some free software called Publish or Perish. The site discusses a number of journal, article, and author impact factor metrics. The software uses Google Scholar to calculate citation based impact factor metrics.

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This might be a good place to start. Eigenfactor is a scholarly journal and article scoring, and ranking, system. It is a free service offered by the University of Washington. The algorithm, methodology, data set composition and update frequency is described on the Eigenfactor website.

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There's a nice website: http://www.arnetminer.org/page/conference-rank/html/Journal.html - however, it only contains computer science conferences.

It's an interesting question because publication venue is an extremely important factor for the reception of an article - most of these concepts however live inside the heads of the people working in the field; all these metrics imo just try to mimic those concepts. Although having argued in a comment to your question in favor of metrics, actually looking (even superficially) at as many articles as possible from different sources should let you develop an intuition about good and bad publication venues, which is, on the long run, probably the most efficient tool you can get.

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  • $\begingroup$ I've used ArnetMiner! It went offline for awhile, but I'm glad to see it is back again. We talked about it on a statistics blog about a year ago. I'll try to find the URL. $\endgroup$ – Ellie Kesselman May 20 '13 at 0:53

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