4
$\begingroup$

I am trying to understand how KRR works for drug-protein-interaction and many aspects of it seem very confusing.

Supposing I have a data set as follows of Drug-Protein interactions; values show how tightly a drug binds to a target, some of the interactions are missing (NaN), and those are the ones I am trying to predict. Numbers I am giving here are only and only made-up numbers for the sake of explanation, since I cannot copy the entire data set as it contains 100 drugs and 100 proteins. So every number you see here is just a random number!

           [,Protein1] [,Protein2] [,Protein3] [,Protein4] [,Protein5] [,Protein6]
[Drug1,]  6.763232 8.97455 5.655 3.3245454 NaN 3.9232321
[Drug2,]  1.211123 2.34343 9.344 NaN 5.6445 4.343
[Drug3,]  1.3429286  2.8805642 6.1998635 Nan 2.328635 9.34343
[Drug4,]  6.5210577  7.1228635 NaN 4.1228635 4.9998635 6.002805
[Drug5,]  NaN  0.9230754 8.34343 9.09098 7.66575 3.9900
[Drug6,] 1.2167197 0.6700215 0.999 NaN 5.553 1.34343

The approach used in drug discovery is then to compute similarities between proteins and similarities between drugs.

Therefore, there is a Drug Kernel computed to show similarities between all drugs (e.g. from online databases).

           [,Drug1] [,Drug2] [,Drug3] [,Drug4] [,Drug5] [,Drug6]
[Drug1,]  6.454 8.788 5.655 3.3245454 3.32233 3.9232321
[Drug2,]  6.211123 7.34343 9.344 1.2121 5.6445 4.343
[Drug3,]  5.3429286  2.8805642 6.1998635 6.7765 2.328635 9.34343
[Drug4,]  4.5210577  1.1228635 7.34 2.1228635 3.9998635 5.002805
[Drug5,]  9.34  0.9230754 1.34343 9.09098 7.66575 3.9900
[Drug6,]  1.2167197 0.6700215 1.999 1.23 5.553 1.34343

And then protein similarities are computed based on some approach. This matrix will be the Protein Kernel.

           [,Protein1] [,Protein2] [,Protein3] [,Protein4] [,Protein5] [,Protein6]
[Protein1,]  50 80 90 10 20 30
[Protein2,]  60 70 10 10 35 75
[Protein3,]  99 89 51 69 48 10
[Protein4,]  10 54 68 97 64 17
[Protein5,]  60 58 95 64 10 16
[Protein6,]  88 14 97 63 63 10

Then the Kronecker Product is computed for Drug Kernel and Protein Kernel, which directly relates protein-drug pairs.

enter image description here

Here K is the matrix containing Kronecker Products. So basically, it's a bigger matrix, for this case where we have 6 Proteins and 6 Drugs, the K matrix becomes a 36 x 36 matrix.

Now alpha coefficients are computed for Kernel Ridge Regression with the following formula.

enter image description here

K is the kernel matrix that relates drug-target pairs [therefore, Kronecker Products] y is the vector with the labels (binding affinities) [So I assume it is just the vector version of the very first matrix in this post, that is the Drug-Protein interaction matrix, is this correct?] I is the identity matrix (of the same size as the kernel matrix), lambda is the regularization parameter, set preferably to 0.1.

Up to here, I have been able to do everything in R. But my problem starts when I have to do the actual prediction. I do not understand the idea behind KRR, and how to predict those NaN values based on the Kronecker Product K matrix values..

The formula for KRR is: To compute the prediction for the test point using the equation for g(x) this is the formula

enter image description here where x is a test point and x_i’s are training points

My biggest confusion here is, WHAT should I actually put instead of X and X_i? Out of all the matrices I have, which is X for the formula above and which one contains the X_i values? And how actually can the values in the K matrix be the basis for predicting the values in the very first matrix here?!

Any help and guidance will be extremely appreciated as I am very confused understanding how KRR works, especially understanding how it works for Drug-Target interaction when having Kronecker Products. So any input here will be really welcome

(http://arxiv.org/pdf/1601.01507.pdf A paper analyzing what I am trying to do, i.e. relating drugs to proteins by Kronecker Products and then applying KRR, reading the whole paper didn't really clear up anything for me.)

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.