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I'm stuck in somewhere to understand the behavior of those two tests. The problem is sometimes I see both the tests are doing the same thing.

The Repeated Measures ANOVA (RM ANOVA) can have only one condition at the same time right? where two way ANOVA (TW ANOVA) can have multiple conditions at the same time right? For instance:

Eg1: Researcher gives ONE drug (drug A) at beginning of the week1, and then gives the same drug (drug A) after beginning of the week2 to a group (population) and then she wants to find out if it has any effect (has any difference) before giving the drug, after end of one week, after end of two week time. So she measure at those time points. (the researcher don't want to see which makes the difference, she just want to see if any of them has difference or make any significance)

For above example the RM ANOVA can be used right, because it only has one drug (only one condition)? drug A.

Eg2: Researcher gives TWO drugs (drug A and drug B) at beginning of the week1, and then gives the same drugs (drug A and drug B) after beginning of the week2 to a group (population) and then she wants to find out if both of the drugs has any effect (has any difference) before giving the two drugs, after end of one week, after end of two week time. So she measure at those time points. (the researcher don't want to see which makes the difference, she just want to see if any of them has difference or make any significance)

For above example the TW ANOVA can be used right, because it has TWO drugs (two conditions)? drug A & drug B.


Further, if we consider the factors, TW ANOVA says it has two "factors" which is (treatments (drug A & drug B)) and "time". But, RM ANOVA also has those two factors as I see "treatment" (drug A) and "time" .. so what's the difference of two tests if it tests the same factors? I really don't understand unique uses of the two tests.

And statistics is not my stream, I'm just considering to use this for one of my researches :).

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