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I am very bad with statistics therefore I hope you guys can be kind.

I have two groups of data, say: Stroke ($n=5$) Healthy ($n=30$)

where $n$ is the number of subjects. Each subject have 10 readings for every parameters I am taking. I would like to do a comparison between stroke and healthy if there are any significant different between the group, so how should I do it?

The thing that I don't really understand is because for each subject in each group have 10 readings. How can I compare the mean between group?

P.s. the reason why I am taking 10 readings is because I am not taking the cholesterol level or stuff like that, but grip force of a person, which will be different (slightly) from trial to trial.

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    $\begingroup$ If each person has 10 readings for blood pressure, then there is probably a reason that they have so many. I'm guessing they are taken over time, perhaps before and after some treatment. But please tell us why there are 10 readings. $\endgroup$ – Peter Flom Aug 22 '16 at 11:16
  • $\begingroup$ Are you familiar with ANOVA? $\endgroup$ – Tim Aug 22 '16 at 11:17
  • $\begingroup$ Are the readings / parameters different variables (blood pressure, heart rate, cholesterol, etc.), or the same? $\endgroup$ – gung Aug 22 '16 at 11:33
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    $\begingroup$ From a second question this user has posted, "P.s. the reason why I am taking 10 readings is because I am not taking the cholesterol level or stuff like that, but grip force of a person, which will be different (slightly) from trial to trial" $\endgroup$ – adunaic Aug 22 '16 at 12:29

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