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I am working my way for the first time through predicting a continuous dependent variable in a problem where all independent variables are categorical using python statsmodels. I would like to add to this model 'y ~ + C(x1) + C(x2) + C(x3)' all possible quadratic terms. What is the right notation for that?

EDIT: one of my categorical variables is age, which I binned in four different bins. All other are transformed into dummy. So the idea was to square age.

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  • $\begingroup$ Please clarify. Suppose one of your categorical models is region {East, West, North, or South}. Would you try to square "East"? $\endgroup$ – rolando2 Mar 19 '17 at 22:17
  • $\begingroup$ I imagined that if one of the categories is age, and I build a few age bins, I could still square age and have a meaning associated to it $\endgroup$ – famargar Mar 20 '17 at 6:51
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Quadratic terms for categorical variables are undefined because you cannot square a categorical variable. On the other hand, given that you have a continuous variable with nonlinear relationship to your outcome/dependent variable, categorization may help and be such that it is synonymous to introducing quadratic terms but with the added benefit of simpler model to build and explain.

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