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I'm fascinated by the concept of graph, be it the social network, the book-topic relationship and others. By graph I mean something like this:

enter image description here

I want to know, how to visualize the data, and is there any mathmatical background/properties behind it? Speficially, I want to know:

  1. How is the graph data layed out? How the distance between different nodes is determined?

  2. Is there any good book on this topic?

  3. Any good example on applying the graph visualization?


I find some good links to start with:

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Graph visualization is an entire field of study, and a vast one. What algorithm you want to use to layout your graph depends on the structure of your graph (is it sparse, small, bipartite, a tree, etc.), on any other structure present (in your example, some nodes are emphasized), on whether you want to emphasize certain aspects and so forth.

One professor I used to study under is Dorothea Wagner. One possibility for you would be to take a look at any courses she or her group offer and at the suggested reading, e.g., here. Or you may want to look at Drawing Graphs by Kaufmann and Wagner. I personally liked Graph Drawing: Algorithms for the Visualization of Graphs (Di Battista et al., 1999) back in my younger days, but this may be dated by now.

Finally, this is not really a statistical question. You might get better answers at Programmers.SE or Computer Graphics.SE or CS.SE, though a quick look at their tags didn't turn up anything.

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Network data is all about statistics. There are node level statistics (describing individual points within the graph) such as degree centrality, and graph-level statistics which describe the overall network, such as average distance between nodes, density, and fragmentation.

https://www.amazon.com/Statistical-Analysis-Network-Data-Statistics/dp/038788145X

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  • $\begingroup$ Was this intended as a comment on the other answer? $\endgroup$ – mdewey Nov 3 '17 at 16:26

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