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If the p-value is greater than 0.900, should you reject $H_0$ at the 0.10 level?"

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  • $\begingroup$ Can you add additional information? Which test are you using? What is your sample size? What is the setting in which you are applying your test? $\endgroup$ – Ferdi Oct 19 '17 at 8:28
  • $\begingroup$ If the p-value (significance level/confidence level) is greater than 0.900, should you reject H0 (the null hypothesis) at the 0.10 (significance/confidence) level. $\endgroup$ – user181466 Oct 19 '17 at 9:04
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for your comment. You do not have to repeat your question in the comment, but it would be great if you edit your question and add some more details. $\endgroup$ – Ferdi Oct 19 '17 at 9:17
  • $\begingroup$ @Ferdi I don't see that further information is needed. It seems clear enough. $\endgroup$ – Glen_b Oct 19 '17 at 11:05
  • $\begingroup$ It is so clear, that anyone using the term 'p-value' should easily give the correct answer. Ferdi's questions are understandable as a means of clearing up, what question was actually meant to be posed. $\endgroup$ – Bernhard Oct 19 '17 at 12:37
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If the p value is 0.9 you could only reject H_0 at the 0.9 level; that is, even if the null hypothesis is true in the population, it would be very easy to get a test statistic at least as extreme as the one you got.

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A p-value of 0.9 means that the probability of observing your data or something more extreme given the 'statistical process und the null hypothesis' is actually 90%. For rejection of $ H_0 $ your level of significance (type 1 error) needs to 0.9 or higher which are unreasonably large values.

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