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The results will simply be two correlations: one relating total quantity over the last 7 days (a.k.a average sleep) with performance (to give us an indication of the effect of an accumulated sleep debt on performance), and (night before) the other relating only the quantity from the last 24 hours (a.k.a night before).

I am not clear on how to write the results down in my lab report. This was what I came up with the following:

To assess the size and direction of the relationship between sleep and average memory span, a Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) was calculated. The correlation between these two variables was positive and moderate, r(134) = .57, p < 0.01. This finding supports the hypothesis that adequate amount of sleep the night before an event leads to a better memory span.

My question is: Is the result I have written fully describing the SPSS analysis?

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    $\begingroup$ APA style guide seems to be clear about it ( r(df) = value, p < threshold ), so I wonder what is your question in here? $\endgroup$
    – Tim
    Nov 14, 2017 at 13:08
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    $\begingroup$ I see you edited your question, but my question remains: what exactly is unclear for you..? $\endgroup$
    – Tim
    Nov 15, 2017 at 11:48
  • $\begingroup$ I am not clear on how to write the results down in my lab report. This was what I came up with the following: To assess the size and direction of the relationship between sleep and average memory span, a Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) was calculated. The correlation between these two variables was positive and moderate, r(134) = .57, p < 0.01. This finding supports the hypothesis that adequate amount of sleep the night before an event leads to a better memory span. My question is: Is the result I have written fully describing the SPSS analysis? $\endgroup$
    – era
    Nov 16, 2017 at 14:05
  • $\begingroup$ The table shows 0.57 correlation in a different place (between average sleep and the night before sleep)! $\endgroup$
    – amoeba
    Nov 20, 2017 at 13:33

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@Tim's answer's in the comment is actually very clear, but let me find another reference for it.

Correlations

  • Results of the Pearson correlation indicated that there was a significant positive association between transformational leadership and job satisfaction, (r(112) = .60, p = .012).
  • Results of the Spearman correlation indicated that there was a significant positive association between years of experience and job satisfaction (rs(112) = .53, p < .001).

    In both of the above examples, the number following r in parentheses corresponds to the degrees of freedom (df), which is directly tied to the sample size. Then the correlation coefficient is reported, followed by the p-value. Note that when a p-value is less than .001, we do not report p = .000. This is because p-values can never be equal to zero. P-values below .001 are reported as p < .001.

http://www.statisticssolutions.com/reporting-statistics-in-apa-format/

According to it, your r(134) = .57, p < 0.01 could capture the correlation between Night_before and Average_sleep. However, I guess what you are interested in is probably the correlation between Night_before and Average_memory or the correlation between Average_Sleep and Average_memory.

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