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I am trying to compare different survey questions against each other to show greatest improvement of scores. Here is a description of the case:

I have customer service questions that I am trying to compare month to month improvement to. My issue is that certain questions have scored relatively high and others very low. Theoretically, the low scoring questions have a greater opportunity for improvement than the higher scoring ones. (Example, one question has scored a 65% where the best score of another question is 85%. So it is easier for the 65% question to improve than the 85% question.) Is there a way to normalize/standardize the scores where I can show which improvement is the greater achievement?

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  • $\begingroup$ can you make your question title more informative? $\endgroup$
    – Haitao Du
    Dec 28 '17 at 21:07
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If I understand you correctly, all you need to do is compute the relative improvement month-to-month of each of the questions. Say question $q_i$ has a score at month $j$ of $q_{i j}$, then the improvement from month $j$ to month $j+1$ is $\frac{q_{i j+1}}{q_{i j}}$. Multiply this quantity by 100 to have a percentage if you wish. Being relative to each other, these improvements are already normalized and can be compared across questions.

However, you might want to define some other metric for performance: you might want to stress the effects of the law of diminishing returns by weighting gains in questions which are already close to 100%, or maybe the other way around...

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  • $\begingroup$ Lets try this another way. I have five scored questions on my survey. I'm going to benchmark 2018 against each question's Year to Date score of 2017, trying to see who has the biggest improvement. I'm trying to compare apples to apples knowing that a question with a high benchmark is going to take more effort to raise their score .1 than it is for a low benchmarked score. $\endgroup$
    – Allen Chin
    Dec 28 '17 at 18:28

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