2
$\begingroup$

I recently read this article analyzing the top five journals in economics using bibliometrics. I was very interested, and as I'm a PhD student who wants to start publishing, I thought a good project might be to repeat this type of analysis myself but for statistics journals, as part of getting a sense of what is going on now in statistics. The authors of the linked study managed to cite papers of surveys of economists asking them what the top journals in their field are, but I have not found a similar resource for statistics.

First, I'd like to know what people here perceive the top five statistics journals to be (or even if five is a bad number and I should expand it). Right now my list is the Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series B (JRSB), Journal of the American Statistical Association (JASA), *Annals of Statistics (AoS), Journal of Statistical Software (JSS), and Biostatistics (Bios).

My next question would be whether it's even acceptable to make a "top 5" list for statistics. While the authors of the linked paper did so for economics, it seems like statistics is more subdivided, so I should purposefully expand my list to include more domain-focused journals even if they are not ranking highly on general surveys.

$\endgroup$

closed as primarily opinion-based by Nick Cox, Stephan Kolassa, Peter Flom Mar 15 '18 at 11:59

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 3
    $\begingroup$ I think your last paragraph nails it. Statistics is a vast field, and you won't be able to follow all good journals. What the "best" ones are will depend heavily on what you are interested in. $\endgroup$ – Stephan Kolassa Mar 15 '18 at 8:00
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ My prejudice is that AoS wants novel and proof-heavy fancy theoretical results. It gives a lot of academic bragging rights (I am certainly impressed), but a lot of hugely important practice oriented work just does not fit there. Also, bibliometrics will tell you the whole story. E.g. in my field there are journal where statisticans from state regulatory authorities publish what are almost mroe regulatory (rather than truly statistical) essays that rack up huge citation counts. Plus there's lots of predatory junk journals (sigh, my inbox is full of invites) that do well of bibliometrics. $\endgroup$ – Björn Mar 15 '18 at 9:18
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ I think the question makes some sense, but a) Is certainly opinion oriented since it asks for our opinions rather than metrics and b) Might not produce a good list of journals for you to follow. If you are getting a PhD in stat then you should have a sense of what sort of research in statistics you are interested in. Probably very few people would need to follow the 5 journals you list (and the same is probably true in economics or any other field). $\endgroup$ – Peter Flom Mar 15 '18 at 11:58
  • $\begingroup$ There's Theoharakis & Skordia (2003), "How Do Statisticians Perceive Statistics Journals?", The American Statistician, 57, 2. Conducting such surveys isn't among the purposes of our site - see the Help Center - but if you want you could edit your question to ask for references to & comparison of published surveys or otherwise derived rankings. $\endgroup$ – Scortchi Mar 15 '18 at 12:35