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I have 3 categorical independent variable and all the variables are more than 2 categories like 6 locations, 4 types, 6 maturity levels. Can I still use multiple regression? If so, how can I do that? If not, is there a better test for my experiment?

I was asked to clarify more: To explain more: I have 6 dependent variables and I want to see, for example if the location has an effect on my dependent variables. should I look at this effect one-by-one? Can I look the effect of 3 categorical independent variable on a dependent variable at the same time?

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  • $\begingroup$ Re the edit: did you perhaps write "dependent" for "independent"? $\endgroup$
    – whuber
    Commented May 13, 2018 at 20:06
  • $\begingroup$ I have 3 categorical independent variable and 6 independent variable as I wrote in the original question. $\endgroup$
    – Lily
    Commented May 18, 2018 at 14:01
  • $\begingroup$ Again your comment is confusing. You wrote "6 dependent" in the question but now your comment says "6 independent"! $\endgroup$
    – whuber
    Commented May 18, 2018 at 15:02
  • $\begingroup$ Sorry @whuber that was a typo! As stated in the original question, I have 3 categorical independent variable and 6 dependent variables and I am trying to explain the effect of these 3 categorical variables on each of those 6 independent variables. $\endgroup$
    – Lily
    Commented May 23, 2018 at 21:40
  • $\begingroup$ I give up...once again you refer to those 6 variables both as "dependent" and "independent." $\endgroup$
    – whuber
    Commented May 24, 2018 at 0:16

2 Answers 2

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You can definitely use dummy variables (be sure to leave out one for your reference category), but the "maturity levels" sounds ordinal. Here's a related question with some interesting discussion about how to handle an ordinal predictor.

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  • $\begingroup$ I am completely new so I am trying to learn. So let's say I am using dummy variables. Should the number of observations in the categories be same? I have read it somewhere but I might get confused since I am trying to learn it in a short time period. $\endgroup$
    – Lily
    Commented May 13, 2018 at 12:52
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    $\begingroup$ There is no requirement for categories to be equally numerous. Nevertheless you're at the mercy of those small frequencies. The coefficient estimate inevitably is more sensitive to individual values. This can help or hinder. $\endgroup$
    – Nick Cox
    Commented May 14, 2018 at 11:24
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You can include dummy variables for each categorical variable or you can refer to multi-factor ANOVA tests (see e.g., this link)

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    $\begingroup$ The same method in different guises! $\endgroup$
    – Nick Cox
    Commented May 14, 2018 at 11:19

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