0
$\begingroup$

I am writing an essay about artificial neural network, and I am asked to provide academic sources in this essay. When I search for "artificial neural network" on the Internet, I find many papers that are related to "neural network", but not explicitly related to "artificial neural network". It seems that "artificial neural network" and "neural network" are the same thing. Are they the same thing? If they are, is there any academic source that points out that? If there is, where is it?

$\endgroup$
3
$\begingroup$

As the name suggests, an "artificial neural network" is a neural network that is artificial - i.e. not a biological one. The addition of the word "artificial" is there to emphasize the non-biological nature of the neural network. In the literature, the two terms "artificial neural network" and "neural network" are used basically interchangeably because it should be apparent from context what the author is talking about. If you find papers about "neural networks" and they are talking about computing then obviously they are referring to "artificial neural networks". If you find papers about "neural networks" and they are talking about biological brains/nervous systems then they are talking about biological neural networks. I am not certain how common it is to talk about "neural networks" in the biological sense.

$\endgroup$
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ (+1) The only caveat that I would add is that among the scientists who construct models of how the brain works (biomedical engineers, cognitive scientists, etc.) the distinction is very important (and they're very picky about it!). $\endgroup$ – Sycorax Jun 22 '18 at 20:43
  • $\begingroup$ You should have said "in the AI literature" and not in "In the literature". $\endgroup$ – nbro Feb 9 at 14:01
0
$\begingroup$

The academic blog https://www.learningmachines101.com/?s=Hot+dog Is one source with references.

A neuroscientist will tend to assume that the primary Definition of The term "neural network" is: a network consisting Of biological nerve cells.

So when speaking to an audience which includes Neuroscientists the qualifier "artificial" in "Artificial neural network" is required.

$\endgroup$

We're looking for long answers that provide some explanation and context. Don't just give a one-line answer; explain why your answer is right, ideally with citations. Answers that don't include explanations may be removed.

0
$\begingroup$

Artificial Neural Network and Neural Network are same in meaning w.r.t. AI and Machine Learning. Researchers use the term interchangeably. That's why the search engine displayed like that. In terms of Biology, a neural network will refer to the communication structure of the brain.

I believe there is hardly any resource that will point the similarity. We use ANN and NN as synonyms to each other and do not require any explicit mentioning.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.