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This question is in reference to introductory statistics or research methods classes where students are asked to learn the basics of statistical inference. Early when I started teaching statistics, I came up with 5 "seminal" pictures...pictures that I told my students were important to understand deeply in order to do well in the course. But, over the years, the reference to these pictures in my course materials waned.

Recently, I used an old graphic labeled "Seminal Picture #2" in class. Though none of my students asked about picture #1, I was curious to recall what they were. Thankfully, I did recall...and more curiously, my naive/novice intuition as a stats pedagogue from decades past appears to have been reasonably correct.

My question has two parts: ¿How many seminal pictures would you say there are for an introductory statistics (let's say courses up through multiple regression or ANOVA & experimental design)? And, ¿what are those pictures?

My thought is that the pictures could be described with but a few words/phrases by an expert, and thus probably don't need to be "drawn" here (though I could be wrong). And, though this may bias the answers I hope to see, I will offer one such possible candidate: the moving normal curves along a regression line.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Robert Long, user158565, Peter Flom Dec 17 '18 at 11:40

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ The fact that this question was closed because it is opinion based is insulting to statistics education professionals. Quote: "but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise." It is shameful how statisticians view the "specific expertise" of educators as opinion. $\endgroup$ – Gregg H Feb 25 at 13:05

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