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I have two sets of coefficient of variations (cv):

ste1 = c(cv1, cv2, ..., cv15)

set2 = c(cv1, cv2, ..., cv15)

how can I compare set1 with set2? which test should I apply?

I know that if I want to compare only two CVs I can use one of the followings:

Feltz, C. J., & Miller, G. E. (1996). An asymptotic test for the equality of coefficients of variation from k populations. Statistics in Medicine, 15(6), 647-658.

Krishnamoorthy, K., & Lee, M. (2014). Improved tests for the equality of normal coefficients of variation. Computational Statistics, 29(1-2), 215-232.

but how can I compare two vectors of CVs?

Is it fine to only find the distribution of set1 and set2 and if they follow normal distributions, then I use any test which can be applied to normal distributions?

Thanks a lot and looking forward,

________________________________Update____________________________________

I have two populations, each includes 15 individuals. For each individuals I have measurements overtime, I summarized each individuals with its corresponding CV value.

Now I have two sets including 15 CVs per each population and I want to compare two populations to see which shows higher changes in comparison to the other one.

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  • $\begingroup$ Some more information about the underlying data would be welcome, because ordinarily (a) comparing statistics like a CV requires knowing the amounts of data involved in each one and (b) they are unlikely to have a Normal distribution. Moreover, how you proceed might depend on the purpose of your comparison: what is your hypothesis? $\endgroup$ – whuber Dec 7 '18 at 16:23
  • $\begingroup$ I have two populations, each includes 15 individuals. For each individuals I have measurements overtime, I summarized each individuals with its corresponding CV value. $\endgroup$ – sbmm Dec 10 '18 at 10:12
  • $\begingroup$ Now I have two sets including 15 CVs per each population. $\endgroup$ – sbmm Dec 10 '18 at 10:13
  • $\begingroup$ and I want to compare two populations to see which shows higher changes in comparison to the other one. $\endgroup$ – sbmm Dec 10 '18 at 10:13

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