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I have a metric that is defined as $1 - Accuracy$ and I need a name for it. Is there a scientific name for the complement of accuracy?

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    $\begingroup$ Seems as if there may be more than one definition for accuracy in common usage. Which do you mean? $\endgroup$ – Avraham Dec 12 '18 at 19:48
  • $\begingroup$ I mean specifically accuracy. I have a metric that is defined in academics as blah_blah_accuracy and I can only compute 1-X of that metric. So, I was curious for the definition of the inverse of accuracy to call my metric blah_blah_(inverse of accuracy) $\endgroup$ – nikolaevra Dec 12 '18 at 23:04
  • $\begingroup$ I don't mean to be a stickler, but what you're describing here isn't an 'inverse', it's a 'complement' (or, a particular type of complement if you're going down proper fuzzy theory, albeit 1-a is the commonest version used and the one typically implied unless explicitly specified otherwise). In fact, 'the complement of the accuracy' is a perfectly valid description for it and could be notated as $A^c$ (if accuracy is notated as $A$). $\endgroup$ – Tasos Papastylianou Dec 12 '18 at 23:29
  • $\begingroup$ @TasosPapastylianou is right. You are looking for the complement, so long as $A$, and thus $A^c$ or $\bar{A}$ is restricted to $[0, 1]$. $\endgroup$ – Avraham Dec 12 '18 at 23:52
  • $\begingroup$ Right, I will update the question $\endgroup$ – nikolaevra Dec 13 '18 at 3:29
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I've seen people use $\text{error rate} = 1 - \text{accuracy}$, on the premise that accuracy is the proportion of samples classified correctly, so the error rate is the proportion of samples classified incorrectly.

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enter image description here would be my guess but that's just me ...................!

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  • $\begingroup$ It's about name of the meric, not English language. $\endgroup$ – Tim Dec 13 '18 at 5:44
  • $\begingroup$ @Tim I beg to differ: the question seems to be only about English. This answer by IrishStat needed to be posted if only to point out its obviousness (+1). $\endgroup$ – whuber Dec 13 '18 at 16:06

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