2
$\begingroup$

I'm trying to determine the threshold from my original variable from an ROC curve. I have generated the curve using the variable and outcome, and I have generated threshold data from sklearns ROC function. However, I am confused as to how the threshold relates back to the values of the variable for identification of the cut off.

I've produced a minimum working example:

import numpy as np
from sklearn import metrics
from sklearn.linear_model import LogisticRegression
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

x = np.random.randint(40, 400, 100).reshape(-1, 1)
y = np.random.randint(0, 2, 100)

model = LogisticRegression()
model.fit(x, y)
probs = model.predict_proba(x)
fpr, tpr, thresholds = metrics.roc_curve(y, probs[:,1])

plt.plot(tpr, fpr)
plt.plot(np.linspace(0,1,10), np.linspace(0,1,10))

threshold_of_interest = threshold[np.argmax(trp - fpr)]

So basically how to relate the 'threshold_of_interest' back to 'x'? Thanks!

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ What do you mean by "values of the variable for identification of the cut off". With the calculated threshold, you can find the predicted class (predicted y) corresponding to each x variable. For example: suppose 0 and 1 in y implies good or bad, so based on your threshold ('threshold_of_interest'), you can estimate whether the predicted probability(for a given x variable value) will belong to class 1 or 0. $\endgroup$ – Harshit Mehta Feb 7 at 17:22
4
$\begingroup$

Thanks for supplying an (almost) working example. I fixed some typos and a plot that might help you to understand the output.

import numpy as np
from sklearn import metrics
from sklearn.linear_model import LogisticRegression
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

x = np.random.randint(40, 400, 100).reshape(-1, 1)
y = np.random.randint(0, 2, 100)

model = LogisticRegression()
model.fit(x, y)
probs = model.predict_proba(x)
fpr, tpr, thresholds = metrics.roc_curve(y, probs[:,1])

# %%
plt.subplots(figsize=(10, 6))
plt.plot(fpr, tpr, 'o-', label="ROC curve")
plt.plot(np.linspace(0,1,10), np.linspace(0,1,10), label="diagonal")
for x, y, txt in zip(fpr[::5], tpr[::5], thresholds[::5]):
    plt.annotate(np.round(txt,2), (x, y-0.04))
rnd_idx = 27
plt.annotate('this point refers to the tpr and the fpr\n at a probability threshold of {}'.format(np.round(thresholds[rnd_idx], 2)), 
             xy=(fpr[rnd_idx], tpr[rnd_idx]), xytext=(fpr[rnd_idx]+0.2, tpr[rnd_idx]-0.25),
             arrowprops=dict(facecolor='black', lw=2, arrowstyle='->'),)
plt.legend(loc="upper left")
plt.xlabel("FPR")
plt.ylabel("TPR")

enter image description here

Remember, that the ROC curve is based on a confidence threshold. Here you provided the probabilities from the LR classifier. Normally, you would use 0.5 as decision boundary. However, you can choose whatever boundary you want - and the ROC curve is there to help you! Sometimes TPR is more important to you than FPR. When you only plot the TPR and the FPR against each other you'll loose the threshold information. However, you can easily add them to the plot. I only annotated every 5th value but this should be enough the see the relationship (high confidence - bottom left, low confidence - top right). Since your question was actually "how to relate the treshold of interest back to x", the answer is you cannot. X was your input matrix on which you performed the prediction. The thresholds are only related to the prediction from the LR classifier (probs in your code).

Note that sklearn does not compute the tpr / fpr after each entry. The dimension of your tpr is (60,) but your test case had dimension (100,). You can read up on this by studying the the drop_intermediate parameter.

HTH

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Great answer, thanks a lot ! However, since I know the 'probs' for each value of x, can't I then relate these back to the threshold? $\endgroup$ – CMac77 Jan 31 at 9:46
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks, I am not entirely sure what you mean. The idea is that you would for example say, for all the xi where my probability is below 0.75 I do not take the prediction as granted and maybe omit them? $\endgroup$ – Kam Sen Jan 31 at 17:25

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.