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I am trying to do a research proposal where I planned on doing a pretest-posttest experiment on 2-3 groups of subjects (measure baseline indicators of anxiety, depression, self-esteem, body dissatisfaction, asses that they have all a similar baseline, randomly assign subjects to one of 3 conditions -treatment 1, treatment 2, control group then measure them again afterwards). I want to see if initial indicators changed from the beginning due to treatment and how. Note: the first treatment I anticipate a slight effect in a negative way, that is anxiety, depression etc to be affected slightly whereas treatment 2 I would guess would affect them in a slightly positive way. My coordinate teacher has given me no help here at the methodology part and I, slightly confused by all the research models, got myself stuck. Is this a realistic research design? if not should I remove one treatment or the control group, then which statistical tool should I use to analyze my data? I searched for days for similar designs and have gotten even more confused. I guess I just need a point of direction and the rest I can figure out myself. Please help.

Thank you in advance.

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Yes, this a common research design. You have two factors: treatment condition (between subjects), and time (within subjects). You can conduct a two-factor mixed ANOVA to analyze your results. This may be difficult if it is your first time, so I would recommend seeking statistical consulting from an advanced student in your area.

More information on your research design: https://www.researchgate.net/post/Two-Way_ANOVA_or_Mixed_ANOVA

Doing mixed ANOVAs in SPSS: https://statistics.laerd.com/spss-tutorials/mixed-anova-using-spss-statistics.php

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  • $\begingroup$ thank you so much, now I'm onto something, I can follow examples and apply to my own example $\endgroup$ – Irina M. Apr 2 '19 at 21:13

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