0
$\begingroup$

I am confused after learning about the different terms.

I understood Standard error of the means to be the Standard Deviation of the sample means, whilst Sampling error is the Standard Deviation within one sample

Am i understanding it correctly? Or have I oversimplified the comparisons or made a mistake in my understanding of the two concepts?

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

You have misunderstood the concept of sampling error. Sampling error is the error that is incurred when the statistical characteristics of a population is estimated from a sample of the population due to the choice of sample.

As a concept this is distinct from the standard error, which you understand correctly.

To demonstrate the distinction a little more clearly, consider a population that contains a single member with some characteristic C. Now imagine that you wish to measure the average C within this population. As the population only contains a single member, only one sample is possible, the sample that measures the single existing member. As such there can be no sampling error due to there being no choice in the sample to take.

Despite this it is still be possible to take repeated samples from this population, each of which could have its own unique 'measurement' error. As such these repeated measurements could produce differing estimates of C and as such have a standard error greater than 0.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ your last sentence mentions standard error. Did you mean sampling error? $\endgroup$ – user10433947 Apr 16 at 12:55
  • $\begingroup$ No, I meant standard error. In my example there is zero sampling error (as a census was taken) and positive standard error. This is caused by the estimate also containing a random non-sampling error (measurement error) that creates differences between each run of the census. $\endgroup$ – Ryan Apr 16 at 13:39

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.