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I want to create a graphic to explore relationship between 3 continuous and 1 categorical variable. I have 2 different examples I want to investigate.

1- the numeric variables are

  • num of bedrooms range (1-10)
  • num of bathrooms range (1-8)
  • num of people accommodates (1-16)

categorical variable is

  • availability (3 levels)

2-

  • Blood Pressure (2-150)
  • Blood Urea (1-400)
  • Sodium (4-200)

categorical variable is

  • chronic Kidney Disease (Yes and No)

what would be the ideal graphics to explore the relationship between all 4 variables in each example.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Michael Chernick, Peter Flom Jun 18 at 19:29

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Simplest may be three scatterplots for bed vs bath, bed vs people, bath vs people, with points in each of two colors (or symbols) for available/unavailable. maybe see this. $\endgroup$ – BruceET Jun 17 at 2:49
  • $\begingroup$ I would do 3D scatter plots with surface fitting for each level, e.g., kidney disease yes/no. $\endgroup$ – Carl Jun 19 at 22:17
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First, none of these variables is continuous. You can't have 1.320 bedrooms.

Second, you say "all three" but I think you mean "all four".

Third, what graphic you should use depends on exactly what you want to show. Some choices here are:

  1. A scatterplot matrix
  2. A mosaic plot
  3. Some sort of lattice plot
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  • $\begingroup$ It could also be blood sugar, blood urea, serum creatinine and binary variable Chronic Kidney Disease. $\endgroup$ – Asim Adnan Jun 18 at 12:38
  • $\begingroup$ That would be completely different. Please post your ACTUAL problem. $\endgroup$ – Peter Flom Jun 18 at 19:28
  • $\begingroup$ I updated the question $\endgroup$ – Asim Adnan Jun 19 at 20:18

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