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I have a regression model (not necessarily linear regression) and a test set. I would like to be able to say: "If you use my model, then with probability 95%, the prediction error will be in the interval [a,b]" where the prediction error is the difference between predicted y and the real y as given by the test data.

Is there any method to estimate the values a and b from the test set?

I know that using bootstrapping I can calculate confidence interval on the predicted value in a given point x. But I need a confidence interval on the error, independently of x.

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  • $\begingroup$ It is common that you can not get what you want. Generally, the CI based on the regression is the function of $x$. $\endgroup$ – user158565 Jun 21 '19 at 2:51
  • $\begingroup$ Why I can get it for classification but not for regression? $\endgroup$ – aburkov Jun 21 '19 at 3:02
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    $\begingroup$ Why not just compute the appropriate quantiles of the test errors? $\endgroup$ – Demetri Pananos Jun 21 '19 at 3:50
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You can try to get the distribution of the test error in the following manner:

  1. Randomly divide the dataset into training(plus cross-validation) and test samples.

  2. Estimate the model on the training (plus cross-validation) sample. Estimate the prediction error on the test sample.

  3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 a large number of times. This will give you a distribution of the prediction error. Then, you can generate the confidence interval of the prediction error from this distribution.

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  • $\begingroup$ What is this "large number of times"? Also how many examples the dataset must have for this technique to work? I believe that 5 examples would not be enough. 10 either. What is a reasonable number? $\endgroup$ – aburkov Jun 27 '19 at 18:26

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