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As the title suggest, does gibbs sampling require to know the partition function? For example, if I want to sample variable $a$ and I have worked out $p(a|rest) \propto f(a|rest)$ where $rest$ represents the rest of the variables, do I need to work out the partition function $Z$ that satisfies $p(a|rest) = \frac{1}{Z} f(a|rest)$?

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    $\begingroup$ If you recognize $f$ as the kernel of a density from which you can directly sample, you'd not need to write $p$ down; although "recognizing the kernel" means that you know already the partition function. If you don't know the partition function and don't have a way to directly sample from $p \propto f$ , you could take a slice sampling, rejection sampling, or Mertropolis-Hasting step or any other sampling step that requires only that the target is known up to a constant. $\endgroup$ – baruuum Jul 6 at 6:24
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Gibbs Sampling doesn't explicitly require you to know $Z$. It requires you to sample from the full conditionals, i.e. $\frac{1}{Z}f(\alpha|\text{rest})$, in some way which means knowing $Z$ already, or approximating it via various MCMC methods (e.g. Metropolis-Hastings, choosing suitable proposal function etc.) as @baruuum pointed out. So, if you imagine the case that you have a black-box doing the sampling step for you given the target function, (i.e. you just call sample method); Gibbs depends on it, but doesn't need $Z$ to be known since the sampling step is actually doing the integration for you implicitly.

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  • $\begingroup$ In another case, say we have two variables $a$ and $b$ that we want to sample, we have $p(a|b,rest) = \frac{1}{Z_a}f(a|b,rest)$ and $p(b|a,rest) = \frac{1}{Z_b}g(b|rest)$, we can work out $f(a|b,rest)$, $g(b|a,rest)$ and $Z_b$ but we do not know $Z_a$, in this case, can we jointly use Gibbs Sampling to sample $b$ and reject sampling to sample $a$? Does the order matter (sample $b$ first or $a$)? $\endgroup$ – Yi Yang Jul 6 at 23:18
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, you can use; and Gibbs doesn’t force any ordering in the sampling scheme. $\endgroup$ – gunes Jul 7 at 7:16

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