0
$\begingroup$

The study examines whether two different factors affect meat eaters' willingness-to-pay for meat alternatives (fake meat). In this case, the two factors are (1) an informational session demonstrating the environmental benefits of going veggie, and (2) "taste-testing" the veggie meat.

I plan on conducting the study with three groups. One control group that has neither factor. One group that is offered only the info session, and one that tests the fake meat. Each group, at the end is offered a meat burger for 3 dollars, but offered a veggie meat burger for 6, 5, and 4. The goal is to see whether the info session and taste test affects the groups' willingness-to-pay for the veggie alternative compared to the control group and whether the info session or taste test affects the willingness-to-pay to a greater extent.

As an undergrad in a graduate seminar, I'm not 100% confident whether this would be a two-way ANOVA or one-way. As far as I understand, this study compares the differences between multiple groups with (two?) factors (the meat eaters and price) Or is the price offering a separate effect, making it a one-way test?

Additionally, if you have any recommendations as to how this test could be performed better, I would gladly take them.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

If i understand you correctly, you will divide the test subjects into three groups. The groups are created based on a single criterion group. Your factors of group are control, informational seassion and taste-testing. Therefore you end up with a one-way anova.

Does is make a big difference to you, if a person pays 6, 5 or 6? When you're interested in willingness-to-pay for veggie, it seems it would be enough to just set the price for the veggie burger fixed higher than meat.

If it does matter, to what degree a person is willing to pay you will need enough people to get reasonable results. Take this into account when conducting your study.

| cite | improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.