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I was just wondering if you can answer this question. I cannot find a simple answer online. Yes or no?

Also, how do you calculate the Sample Mean of a Normal Distribution. I was told it was not simply taking the mean of the data, and there was a more specific method.

Thank you for your time!

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Let’s try it out in R.

x <- rnorm(100); mean(x)==median(x)

Does that always return “true” for you? It shouldn’t. Sample mean and sample median are not the same.

The sample mean of $n$ observations drawn from a normal distribution is the usual $\bar{x}=\dfrac{1}{n}\sum_{i=1}^nx_i$.

Add them up; divide by how many there were.

I’m quite curious about the context when someone told you not to do it this way.

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