7
$\begingroup$

I'm trying to run a basic gradient descent algorithm with a absolute loss function. I can get it to converge to a good solution by it requires a much lower step size and more iterations than had I used square loss. Is this normal? Should I expect absolute loss to take a longer time to come to a good solution or potentially oscillate around a solution more than say squared loss?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Be careful in comparing $f() + \lambda \|x\|_1$ vs. $f() + \lambda \|x\|_2$: the norm1 and norm2 terms scale very differently, $N$ vs. $\sqrt N$. It's a good idea to look at the two terms separately (Funcmon), to see if they're reasonable. $\endgroup$ – denis Dec 16 '15 at 10:03
  • $\begingroup$ A newer relevant post: stats.stackexchange.com/questions/260504/… $\endgroup$ – kjetil b halvorsen Oct 2 '18 at 12:48
4
$\begingroup$

When you say 'a absolute loss function', do you mean you're using least absolute deviations (LAD) instead of the more usual ordinary least squares (OLS)? As that wikipedia article says, although LAD is more robust to outliers than OLS it can be unstable and even have multiple solutions, so it doesn't seem that surprising if it's harder to find the minimum of the objective function even when there's only one.

If you're trying this because you're after some sort of robust regression, I think there are several more attractive alternatives than LAD.

| cite | improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

This is possibly a consequence of a known deficiency of steepest descent algorithms in general. Using a conjugate gradient algorithm may improve convergence.

| cite | improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.