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I have a question on estimating a difference in differences model using Stata. As I understand this, also from other questions, when there are no covariates, estimating the diff in diff using a regular regression (including dummy for year of treatment, dummy for treatment, and interaction) gives the same results as estimating it using a fixed effect command such as Stata's xtreg. It actually is so when I do this with my data, but the standard errors are completely different: when is use Stata's command "reg" i get absolutely no significance, when I use xtreg I get instead a t-statistic of more than 2, with standard errors being almost 4 times smaller. Why is it so? And what does it suggest about the validity of the model and the command to use? What would be best to do when I am also adding covariates later?

Edit: I try to add an example from the code:

gen y07=1 if year==2017 
replace jump=0 if jump!=1
gen did=y07*treat 
xtset id year
xtreg y y07 did, fe r 


Fixed-effects (within) regression               Number of obs     =      4,568
Group variable: id                              Number of groups  =      2,284

R-sq:                                           Obs per group:
     within  = 0.0131                                         min =          2
     between = 0.0008                                         avg =        2.0
     overall = 0.0011                                         max =          2

                                                F(2,2283)         =      12.73
corr(u_i, Xb)  = 0.0069                         Prob > F          =     0.0000

                                 (Std. Err. adjusted for 2,284 clusters in id)
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
             |               Robust
           y |      Coef.   Std. Err.      t    P>|t|     [95% Conf. Interval]
-------------+----------------------------------------------------------------
         y07 |   .5117687   .1409194     3.63   0.000     .2354253    .7881121
         did |   .8282564   .4076776     2.03   0.042     .0287991    1.627714
       _cons |   8.272329   .0809889   102.14   0.000      8.11351    8.431149
-------------+----------------------------------------------------------------
     sigma_u |  18.188562
     sigma_e |  5.4737922
         rho |  .91695247   (fraction of variance due to u_i)




reg y treat y07 did, r 

Linear regression                               Number of obs     =      4,568
                                                F(3, 4564)        =       1.80
                                                Prob > F          =     0.1441
                                                R-squared         =     0.0013
                                                Root MSE          =     18.597

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
             |               Robust
           y |      Coef.   Std. Err.      t    P>|t|     [95% Conf. Interval]
-------------+----------------------------------------------------------------
       treat |   .6513042   .7340444     0.89   0.375    -.7877781    2.090386
         y07 |   .5117687   .6775766     0.76   0.450    -.8166093    1.840147
         did |   .8282564   1.161073     0.71   0.476    -1.448009    3.104522
       _cons |   8.045057   .4404064    18.27   0.000     7.181647    8.908467
------------------------------------------------------------------------------


` ` ` 

Of course I was imprecise in saying the standard error was four times smaller, it's slightly less than tree, but it's the same thing. Of course year the variable "treat" denotes being assigned to the treatment group. 
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    $\begingroup$ Welcome! Just curious, did you specify the -robust- option in Stata? Show us your Stata syntax, if possible. $\endgroup$ May 28, 2020 at 18:55
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the answer. I edited the question, hopefully it's clearer now $\endgroup$
    – Tom
    May 28, 2020 at 20:14
  • $\begingroup$ Please note, this is a design issue in Stata. I also encourage you to try -cluster(id)- in your model using -reg-. Only using -robust- with -reg- is fine, but it cannot relax the within-cluster dependence among observations. $\endgroup$ May 28, 2020 at 21:36
  • $\begingroup$ It is not clear what jump is, and usually you would interact treat with post (y07). $\endgroup$
    – dimitriy
    May 29, 2020 at 0:09
  • $\begingroup$ Good catch. Maybe the OP will clear up why the interaction was computed manually beforehand. $\endgroup$ May 29, 2020 at 0:23

2 Answers 2

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You need to compare apples to apples, so use clustering with OLS and clustering with xtreg, fe (or robust with xtreg, fe, which will default to clustering as Thomas pointed out). These coefficient equivalences are limited to two-period (one pre, and one post) datasets with treatment at the same time for all treated units.

Here's an example of 2x2 DID on a public dataset demonstrating this. Here NJ restaurants are treated (become subject to the minimum wage increase) and PA restaurant are not. February '92 (t=0) is pre and November '92 is post (t=1). The DID parameter is the interaction of t = 1 and NJ = 1. The outcome fte is full-time equivalent employees. Here I will balance the panel in order to get xtreg, fe and OLS to give the same coefficient estimates. If the panel is unbalanced (consists of repeated cross-sections), xtreg, fe will drop some observations that appear in only one year and the estimates will no longer match OLS or manual calculations. You may want to stick with clustered OLS if you have a repeated cross-section.

Here is the result. Note that you can use factor variable notation to create the interactions rather than hard coding them.

. use http://fmwww.bc.edu/repec/bocode/c/CardKrueger1994.dta, clear
(Dataset from Card&Krueger (1994))

. drop if id == 407 // duplicate restaurant
(4 observations deleted)

. drop if missing(fte, treated, t, id)
(19 observations deleted)

. bysort id: keep if _N==2 // balance the panel
(19 observations deleted)

. xtset id t
       panel variable:  id (strongly balanced)
        time variable:  t, 0 to 1
                delta:  1 unit

. 
. /* calculate DID by hand */
. table treated t, c(mean fte N fte) row col

----------------------------------------
New       |
Jersey =  |
1;        |
Pennsylva | Feb. 1992 = 0; Nov. 1992 = 1
nia = 0   |        0         1     Total
----------+-----------------------------
       PA | 20.17333     17.65  18.91167
          |       75        75       150
          | 
       NJ | 17.06927  17.51831  17.29379
          |      314       314       628
          | 
    Total | 17.66774   17.5437  17.60572
          |      389       389       778
----------------------------------------

. di %9.3f (17.51831 - 17.06927) - (17.65 - 20.17333)
    2.972

. 
. /* fit models */
. eststo ols_robust:   qui   reg fte i.treated##i.t, robust

. eststo xtreg_robust: qui xtreg fte i.treated##i.t, fe robust

. eststo xtreg_clust:  qui xtreg fte i.treated##i.t, fe cluster(id)

. eststo ols_clust:    qui   reg fte i.treated##i.t, cluster(id)

. 
. capture ssc install estout

. esttab *, se(%9.7f) noomitted drop(0.treated 0.t 0.treated#0.t) modelwidt(15) mtitles label varwidth(35)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                (1)                (2)                (3)                (4)   
                                         ols_robust       xtreg_robust        xtreg_clust          ols_clust   
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NJ                                           -3.104*                                                  -3.104*  
                                        (1.4475664)                                              (1.4484988)   

Feb. 1992 = 0; Nov. 1992 = 1=1               -2.523             -2.523*            -2.523*            -2.523*  
                                        (1.6371048)        (1.2498119)        (1.2498119)        (1.2506190)   

NJ # Feb. 1992 = 0; Nov. 1992 = 1=1           2.972              2.972*             2.972*             2.972*  
                                        (1.7822146)        (1.3337493)        (1.3337493)        (1.3346107)   

Constant                                      20.17***           17.67***           17.67***           20.17***
                                        (1.3591695)        (0.2232501)        (0.2232501)        (1.3600450)   
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Observations                                    778                778                778                778   
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Standard errors in parentheses
* p<0.05, ** p<0.01, *** p<0.001

Clustering in DID settings is a good idea for reasons outlined in Bertrand, Duflo, and Mullainathan's 2004 QJE paper. Clustering at the level of treatment is also a good idea, but here that is not feasible since there are not enough clusters (since treatment is a state law and we have data from two states only) for that to work well. Generally your SEs will go up when you cluster in DID, but if the errors are negatively correlated within cluster, they might shrink. See this post for the reasons why.


Code:

estimates clear
cls
use http://fmwww.bc.edu/repec/bocode/c/CardKrueger1994.dta, clear
drop if id == 407 // duplicate restaurant
drop if missing(fte, treated, t, id)
bysort id: keep if _N==2 // balance the panel
xtset id t

/* calculate DID by hand */
table treated t, c(mean fte N fte) row col
di %9.3f (17.51831 - 17.06927) - (17.65 - 20.17333)

/* fit models */
eststo ols_robust:   qui   reg fte i.treated##i.t, robust
eststo xtreg_robust: qui xtreg fte i.treated##i.t, fe robust
eststo xtreg_clust:  qui xtreg fte i.treated##i.t, fe cluster(id)
eststo ols_clust:    qui   reg fte i.treated##i.t, cluster(id)

capture ssc install estout
esttab *, se(%9.7f) noomitted drop(0.treated 0.t 0.treated#0.t) modelwidt(15) mtitles label varwidth(35)
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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you, this has been very clea, also for pointing out the use of "##", I knew about # but not this, you can see I'm a newbie. My panel is balanced, so the issue you mention does not arise, and indeed, as I was mentioning in the other answer (please point out to me if it makes sense to comment on every answer separately), now I actually get the same estimate. However, I still don't fully catch the difference in the estimates when I add covariates. I understand this is likely a more econometric question and I should just go back an restudy the topic, but maybe you could give me an intuition. $\endgroup$
    – Tom
    May 29, 2020 at 7:44
  • $\begingroup$ I don't have a lot of intuition for this, but there is a good discussion here. $\endgroup$
    – dimitriy
    May 29, 2020 at 10:28
  • $\begingroup$ If that does not make sense, start another thread. Also, it is perfectly fine to comment on each answer. $\endgroup$
    – dimitriy
    May 29, 2020 at 10:42
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By Stata's design, you should expect the standard errors to be different.

Why is it so?

Note, -robust- handles uncertainty differently depending upon whether you're estimating your model using -reg- or -xtreg, fe-. For instance, -reg- is robust to heteroscedasticity—but results in unclustered standard errors. Once you run -xtreg, fe-, Stata will automatically cluster on your panel variable.

And what does it suggest about the validity of the model and the command to use?

In a panel data context, I would go with -xtreg-. I also want to note that clustering on your panel identifier does not guarantee that your standard errors will go up; clustering can result in less conservative estimates.

What would be best to do when I am also adding covariates later?

I am partial to the former model. I would try estimating your equation with and without your presumably time-varying control variables.

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  • $\begingroup$ Sorry, I thought I had added a comment but I didn't. Thank you, this has been quite helpful. You can see from my code that I' m still learning also with Stata. If I use cluster(id), I get the same estimates as you were suggesting, that was a silly mistake. However, I was now wondering what happens exactly when I add covariates and now the estimates are different. $\endgroup$
    – Tom
    May 29, 2020 at 7:47
  • $\begingroup$ No problem at all. Most of what we are suggesting are best practices. As far as covariates are concerned, I would review the post suggested by Dimitriy. $\endgroup$ May 29, 2020 at 13:56

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