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I am interested in examples of sources (Python code, Python packages, books, book chapters, articles, links etc) for learning statistical and mathematical concepts through Python (it could also be through other languages, but Python is my favorite flavor).

I want something that requires me not just to run the statistical tests, but lets me do (some) of my own building of them in order to understand the mechanism behind it through simulation.

So for example, a book like "Practical Statistics for Data Science" is not what I'm looking for as it doesn't go into enough depth, and actually try to rigorously teach the concepts.
On the other hand, "Think Stats" seems to be more of the correct type, where he tries to teach essentially math-stats through simulation and python. However, I find it annoying that he created all of his own packages. I understand that implementing statistics using base python alone would be a challenge, so I'm looking for something inbetween that and "Think Stats".

I'm also hoping I can teach a few of my co-workers using the graphs.

All leads will be much appreciated.

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You might want to have a look at the book Python for Probability, Statistics, and Machine Learning by José Unpingco. It provides a rather good mixture of in-depth theory and programming. In particular, he rigorously introduces the relevant theoretical concepts and then nicely complements them with illustrative Python code. Furthermore, he does not use tailor-made modules, but relies on the standard modules (scipy, statsmodels, etc.) in his code chunks.

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    $\begingroup$ Jupyter notebooks corresponding to that book are freely available here: github.com/unpingco/… $\endgroup$ – reckoner Jul 19 '20 at 0:47
  • $\begingroup$ This is awesome! thanks team, he does say that an undergraduate introduction to probability and statistics is recommend before this book. By that I'm assuming he means undergraduate Mathematical statistics, and not just the stat 101 (w/o calculus)? $\endgroup$ – Joseph Gutstadt Jul 19 '20 at 3:22
  • $\begingroup$ Based on the rigor in the theoretical sections, I would say so, yes. $\endgroup$ – sp59b2 Jul 19 '20 at 10:44

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