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I have a sample of 300 companies classified according to different economic activities. For example, computer parts comprises 20% of the sample, medical services 5%, wood processing 15%, etc.

In terms of data analysis, what is the best approach to follow? If conducting a general analysis, results will be biased due the differences in proportions among sectors. From this standpoint, which is the recommendation to analyze and present results?

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    $\begingroup$ What is it that you want to find out? You may find this post from my blog helpful. $\endgroup$
    – Peter Flom
    Commented Jan 29, 2013 at 22:32
  • $\begingroup$ I will try to find associations between let's say company size and environmental standards adherence? $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 30, 2013 at 1:44

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You could run a fixed effects model, which would take into account the differences between industries you mention. Most statistical programs will allow you to do this (for example, in Stata type 'help xtreg'). Alternatively, you can create a series of dummy variables from your industry variable and include these in the model. However, you might compare the results from this analysis to those from a a simpler OLS regression, as there may be no difference between industries.

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If you're looking to find out the best way of going about analyzing the data, using R can be a good option. It's extremely easy to pick up and can be used to create some pretty cool visualisations.

Here's a link to a basics tutorial:

https://youtu.be/_lnDe3t97vo

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  • $\begingroup$ It would be great if you would be more specific. $\endgroup$
    – Ferdi
    Commented Jan 13, 2018 at 22:35

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