2
$\begingroup$

Can you actually prove if the null hypothesis is true or a type II error has occurred?

I'm new to statistics (sorry in advance!)

$\endgroup$
1
  • 4
    $\begingroup$ Yes…if you knew the answer before you ran the hypothesis test. That sounds ridiculous, but it can be important to simulation studies. $\endgroup$
    – Dave
    Jun 13 at 0:21
2
$\begingroup$

No, you cannot. The are indistinguishable and this is one of the key challenges in statistics. An alternative comparison can be made between finding a significant result (because H0 is false) vs a type 1 error. We can attempt to control these error rates but it is always a trade off.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

No, but non rejection makes you take a decision. So it acts as if you proved the null in practical sense

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ I kind of follow what you mean, but this is such confusing phrasing for a newcomer to statistics. $\endgroup$
    – Dave
    Jun 13 at 16:38

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.