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In the test there are these 2 questions. My friends and i cannot tell the correct answer because it is so confusing. It is a multiple choice test.

Are two dependent variables correlated?

  • A. always
  • B. never
  • C. only if r>0
  • D. yes if referred to the same feature then the same question but with independent

I hope you can help me it is driving me crazy

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    $\begingroup$ Please add the self-study tag & read its wiki. Then tell us what you understand thus far, what you've tried & where you're stuck. We'll provide hints to help you get unstuck. Please make these changes as just posting your homework & hoping someone will do it for you is grounds for closing. $\endgroup$ Feb 29 at 14:15
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    $\begingroup$ Also, this is only one question. $\endgroup$
    – Peter Flom
    Feb 29 at 14:26
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    $\begingroup$ Gabriele option D does not make much sense to me. Has something got lost in translation? But as already stated you will get better answers if you tell us about your thoughts. $\endgroup$
    – mdewey
    Feb 29 at 14:35
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    $\begingroup$ I wonder if something has been lost in the translation from Italian. In the English, however, I do not see a correct answer, because the answer is that dependent variables do not have to be correlated but can be, and that correlation can be less than zero (strong negative correlation is still dependence). $\endgroup$
    – Dave
    Feb 29 at 14:37

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I wonder if something has been lost in the translation from Italian. In the translation, however, I do not see a correct answer, because the answer is that dependent variables do not have to be correlated but can be, and that correlation can be less than zero (strong negative correlation is still dependence).

For an example of dependent variables that are uncorrelated, consider points along the edge of a circle or that form an $X$ shape. A few other examples are given here, my favorite of which is the dinosaur.

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