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Good evening everyeone,

I am currently working on a set of self-study questions which relate to true/false answers. I am currently faced with a question where the answer claims for it to be false, but I find it true. Not sure if there is an error in the answer. Appreciate some help and advice please.

A confidence interval is an estimate for which there is a specified degree of certainty that the sample statistic will be in the interval.

My take is that the above statement is true as the confidence interval tells us with a specific degree of confidence how likely a value will fall within the range.

Appreciate some advice please.

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  • $\begingroup$ See the answers [here](stats.stackexchange.com/questions/6652/what-precisely-is-a-confidence-interval) which may help clarify the concepts. $\endgroup$ – Glen_b May 4 '14 at 5:23
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You are 100% sure about the value of the sample mean. It is the population mean for which you need a confidence interval.

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Careful. Think about how a confidence interval is constructed from a sample statistic like the sample mean. How certain are you that the sample mean is within the confidence interval?

Recall that the point of the confidence interval is to produce an interval estimate for the population parameter. Upon constructing the interval, you will have a certain level of confidence that the population parameter is in the confidence interval. However, the sample statistic will always be in the confidence interval.

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