Questions tagged [tost]

TOST, an acronym for *two one-sided tests* is a straightforward way of constructing a test of the "negativist" null hypothesis that two population statistics differ by no more than a small researcher-selected equivalence threshold.

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44
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4answers
13k views

Why do statisticians say a non-significant result means “you can't reject the null” as opposed to accepting the null hypothesis?

Traditional statistical tests, like the two sample t-test, focus on trying to eliminate the hypothesis that there is no difference between a function of two independent samples. Then, we choose a ...
39
votes
8answers
19k views

How to test hypothesis of no group differences?

Imagine you have a study with two groups (e.g., males and females) looking at a numeric dependent variable (e.g., intelligence test scores) and you have the hypothesis that there are no group ...
6
votes
3answers
742 views

What is the best method of reporting multiple tests of equivalence?

I am doing a study which will involve multiple tests of equivalence. Is there a standard table for reporting such results? EDIT with more detail: It is a longitudinal study with 5 time points. Our ...
9
votes
3answers
3k views

Equivalence tests for non-normal data?

I have some data that I can't necessarily assume to be drawn from normal distributions, and I would like to conduct tests of equivalence between groups. For normal data, there are techniques like TOST ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

Intuitive explanation of differences between TOST and UMP tests for equivalence

Hypothesis tests for equivalence differ from the more common hypothesis tests for difference. In tests for difference, the null hypothesis is some form of "separate quantities are the same", and ...
13
votes
2answers
981 views

Is there a simple equivalence test version of the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test?

Has two one-sided tests for equivalence (TOST) been framed for the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test to test the negativist null hypothesis that two distributions differ by at least some researcher-specified ...
9
votes
2answers
405 views

Can we accept the null in noninferiority tests?

In a usual t-test of means, using the usual hypothesis testing methods, we either reject the null or fail to reject the null but we never accept the null. One reason for this is that if we got more ...