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Mathematical theory of statistics, concerned with formal definitions and general results.

5
votes
3answers
It is my understanding that a moment generating function (MGF) uniquely determines a distribution with bounded or unbounded support only if the "MGF exists in a neighborhood of zero." But what does i …
asked May 9 '16 by StatsStudent
0
votes
If you assume the rate of change is well-fit by a linear model, just fit a standard linear regression model and then then the average per unit increase in tuition for a 1-unit change in year would be …
answered May 27 '17 by StatsStudent
1
vote
While a bit more general than statistics, I think there have been important advances in methods of reproducible research (RR). For example the development of R's knittr and Sweave packages and "R Mar …
answered Jul 6 by StatsStudent
1
vote
A very reasonable argument could be made that all of the above true in various applications of statistics.
answered Jul 27 '15 by StatsStudent
0
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$\sum_{i=1}^\infty a^{i-1}$ = $1\over{1-a}$, for (|a| < 1) This is a useful identity for a number of reasons. One place it can be used is in showing that the geometric distribution is in fact a PMF …
answered Feb 4 '15 by StatsStudent
0
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Based on the clarified comments, it is my understanding that: You have a population of people who used Product A. There are 1,000 of these people. You are interested in making inferences about the …
answered Jan 9 by StatsStudent
3
votes
Essentially, the Delta Method is a way of "linearizing" a non-linear function using a Taylor Series expansion so that you can find the variance and hence the standard error. For example, let's say yo …
answered Mar 8 '17 by StatsStudent
3
votes
Here is a hint for your self-study question: Is the design matrix full rank? Also, please add the self-study tag. What do you know about full-rank vs. non-full rank matrices and the estimability of …
answered Feb 10 by StatsStudent
5
votes
0answers
This is somewhat of an odd question for CV, but since it's a question about statistical education, I think it falls within the scope of CV. Several years ago I stumbled across a French website that p …
asked Jan 23 by StatsStudent
0
votes
Couldn't you simply split your observations into deciles and then add some noise to each IQ by generating a normal random variable and add the value to the IQ score or am I missing something here? Of …
answered Jul 27 '15 by StatsStudent
7
votes
I have read Christensen's books and would include it too. Certainly you'd want to include the following (in no particular order). P. McCullagh, John A. Nelder. Generalized Linear Models, Second E …
answered Jan 14 '16 by StatsStudent
2
votes
If you don't have concern about the accuraccy degrading over time or don't have concerns that the time of day results in less accurate measurements then I would advocate simplicity here through the us …
answered Feb 26 '16 by StatsStudent
2
votes
I'm assuming in your notation that the $u_i$ is the error term of the $i$th observation. In that case, under the Gauss-Markov model: \begin{eqnarray*} E\left[Y_{i}\right] & = & E\left[\beta_{1}X_{i …
answered Jul 24 '17 by StatsStudent
3
votes
There are many reasons for using mixed or random effects models, but I'll highlight one due to my time constraints. Let's say you have 1500 subjects with 10 measurements taken on each subject, along …
answered Feb 4 '15 by StatsStudent
2
votes
I believe Excel has built in functions to calculate these (see here for example). Is there a reason are you trying to do it manually? The general form for testing regression coefficients is $t$ =$\h …
answered Mar 27 '15 by StatsStudent

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