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A routine exercise from a textbook, course, or test used for a class or self-study. This community's policy is to "provide helpful hints" for such questions rather than complete answers.

2
votes
When the odds are 1, this means males and females are just as likely of getting into an honor class. So when the odds are 1+1 = 2, this means the odds are now twice as likely or a 100% increase in od …
answered Jun 19 '17 by StatsStudent
0
votes
The issue here is really about practical significance, rather than statistical significance. In both examples, the results were "statistically significant", but in example 1 the size of the effect (i …
answered Jun 19 '17 by StatsStudent
1
vote
You both are right. But here's a hint to get the answer in your notes: According to Probability Distributive Laws: \begin{eqnarray*} P[BB\cap(BG\cup BB)] & = & P[(BB\cap BG)\cup(BB\cap BB)] \end{eq …
answered Feb 27 by StatsStudent
1
vote
Here's a hint: what is the formula for the 95% confidence interval? Do any terms in the formula for it look like an estimate of $\sigma_{\epsilon}$?
answered Oct 24 '15 by StatsStudent
0
votes
I think it might do you some good to review the general formula for the sample variance, $\sum_{i=1}^n(x_i-\bar{x})^2\over{n-1}.$ Then explore how you might be able to algebraically manipulate this f …
answered Mar 21 '15 by StatsStudent
5
votes
1answer
This might be a really dumb question, but in a joint PDF of $X$ and $Y$, $f_{XY}(x,y)$, if the support of a random variable $Y$ depends on $X$, are the two random variables necessarily dependent? For …
asked May 9 '17 by StatsStudent
1
vote
The design matrix you have set up is not quite right. Since this is a homework problem, I'll give you hints and help you through the problem. The key to setting up your design matrix involves, unders …
answered Jan 24 '16 by StatsStudent
0
votes
0answers
I am continuing the prepare for an exam by reviewing handouts from an old statistics course I took. The handout came with a set of solutions prepared by the instructor, but I suspect that one of the …
asked Apr 22 '17 by StatsStudent
1
vote
1answer
I am about to complete my master's degree in Statistics at a very well-respected university and one which has a top 5 statistics department in the U.S. (all I have left to do is defend my thesis). I …
asked May 13 '17 by StatsStudent
3
votes
This is a classic Z-test. To calculate a Z-score you simply take your observed sample mean, $\bar{X}_n$ minus your hypothesized value under $H_0: \mu=0$, and divide the result by the standard deviati …
answered Jan 22 '15 by StatsStudent
0
votes
Given your additional comments, it appears that the x-value is fixed at X=1. So there are two observations at that fixed level of x (for the first row). One observation has a $y$ value of 2 and the …
answered Oct 19 '15 by StatsStudent
3
votes
From the problem statement, you are given that a sample of $N$ observations are made from a bivariate normal population with correlation coefficient equal to zero. Under these assumptions, the probab …
answered Dec 31 '18 by StatsStudent
1
vote
3answers
I am studying for an exam and have come across this problem: Let the random variables $X$ and $Y$ have the joint pmf: $f_{XY}(x,y)={2\over{n(n+1)}}$ for $y=1, . . . , x$; $x=1, . . . , n$ Find the …
asked May 6 '17 by StatsStudent
0
votes
You have to recall that $X_1$ and $X_2$ are Poisson random variables and this means the support for $X_1$ and $X_2$ is 0, 1, 2, etc. for each. In other words, $x_1$ and $x_2$ are integers such that $ …
answered Feb 11 by StatsStudent
1
vote
I'll provide a hint to your self-study question: A corollary of a classic statistical theorem states that if $\mathbf{x} \sim N_p(\boldsymbol{\mu}, \sigma^2\boldsymbol{I})$,then $\mathbf{Bx}$ and $\m …
answered Feb 7 by StatsStudent

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