Skip to main content

New answers tagged

0 votes

Correlation between proportion variable and categorical variable

If you want to test a correlation you could construct a linear regression that codes for the categorical variable. You do this by splitting the categorical variable into binary predictors. Your model ...
computer_goblin's user avatar
2 votes

Chi-square test or Z-test for comparing two proportions?

The tests are equivalent. They both test the same null hypothesis $H_0: p_1 = p_2$, versus $H_1: p_1 \ne p_2$ (for the two-sided case). In the two-sample binomial test, we assume a Normal ...
qwr's user avatar
  • 538
0 votes

How to estimate the confidence interval of a very small proportion?

I think this is precisely what Beta distribution is for. If $r\sim Beta\left(\alpha,\,\beta\right)$ then $r$ is the rate of success given that you have observed $\alpha-1$ successes and $\beta-1$ ...
Cryo's user avatar
  • 698
1 vote

How to estimate the confidence interval of a very small proportion?

i would suggest the jeffreys interval see here for this and alternatives https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binomial_proportion_confidence_interval jeffreys interval is a simple formula that just uses ...
seanv507's user avatar
  • 7,065
2 votes
Accepted

Statistical test to see whether one group is larger than the other

It seems to me that you can reduce your data to a simple 2 $\times$ 2 contingency table and run a $\chi^2$ test on it. If you just want to compare the groups, the time variable is irrelevant. You can ...
Igor F.'s user avatar
  • 9,353

Top 50 recent answers are included