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3 votes

Ordinal independent variable (IV) and continuous dependent variable (DV)

You should use the DV that you want to analyze. There is no need for the DV and IV to be on the same scales, or have the same range, or anything else like that. Questions about how to use SPSS (or any ...
Peter Flom's user avatar
  • 117k
2 votes

Ordinal regression, multinomial regression or linear regression with dummy variables?

This is really two questions. One about the choice of regression method, the other about treatment of categorical independent variables. The choice among ordinal, multinomial, or linear (OLS) ...
Peter Flom's user avatar
  • 117k
2 votes

What kind of correlation is this?

As @Dave and @ttnphns point out in the comments, the plot does not really communicate anything because nothing on the graph indicates the number of points sharing the same coordinates (i.e., $[x,y]$ ...
Preston Botter's user avatar
1 vote

Is partial correlation analysis in spss reasonable

Several things. First, Pearson's correlation $r$ does not strictly assume normality of the variables themselves (e.g., for interpretation). The normality assumptions only comes into play when ...
Preston Botter's user avatar
1 vote

PROCESS macro for SPSS - output includes values of the DV which are outside of scale range

The values in the graph input data you get for your dependent variable (the Cons_SCL column) are predicted values from your model, i.e. they are what the model predicts your dependent to be at ...
Sointu's user avatar
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