New answers tagged

0 votes

Which sample standard deviation do you use for estimating standard error of the mean?

If you have a sufficient number of samples of the same size $n$ from the population, a theoretical sampling distribution can be drawn and corresponding to the central limit theorem, you will observe ...
Happy Cretine's user avatar
0 votes

Standard error of estimated coefficient

To complete the answer by @MaartenBuis, Standard deviation is the measure of variability of a sample with individual values (observations). Standard error is the measure of variability of a sample ...
Happy Cretine's user avatar
2 votes

Report standard errors and exact p-value

The $p$ values are already a hairy subject, but I would trust them much less if there were no indicators of where that $p$ value came from. From my personal standpoint, you should always: List the ...
Shawn Hemelstrand's user avatar
6 votes

Report standard errors and exact p-value

This is a style issue, and each journal has its own. However, if it was up to me, I'd require standard errors and make p values optional.
Peter Flom's user avatar
  • 117k
1 vote

Intuitive explanation for dividing by $n-1$ when calculating standard deviation?

We can understand Bessel's correction geometrically by moving into $n$-dimensional space! We will start with 3 dimensions and then generalize. Say we have 3 observations $x_1, x_2, x_3$ of a $\mathcal{...
Steven Gubkin's user avatar
1 vote

How do I combine the error when multiplying a number by a proportion

It's called fractional uncertainty, and for a product or ratio like \begin{equation} q=\frac{x \times \cdots \times z}{u \times \cdots \times w}, \end{equation} the fractional uncertainty of $q$ is \...
Leif Peterson's user avatar
0 votes

How would one describe such irregular data?

You ask How can I describe such data, such that in the end I can quote an "average" cluster size per sensor (including the uncertainty). And finally, per such set of settings of the sensors,...
Peter Flom's user avatar
  • 117k
5 votes

How can I calculate the weight of a study for meta-analysis?

Note that for this kind of weighting for a measure like the relative risk (i.e. you already have the estimates and their confidence intervals), the variance is simply defined as the standard error ...
James Stanley's user avatar
5 votes

How can I calculate the weight of a study for meta-analysis?

Right-ish. You've described a fixed-effects regression. Generally a random effects regression is more appropriate. You estimate this using software - there are lots of options, but my favorite is the ...
Jeremy Miles's user avatar
  • 17.5k
2 votes

Do 95% Confidence Invervals use +- 1.96 standard error or standard deviation?

Others have already answered which you need, standard deviation or standard error, but to form the appropriate weights you need the inverse of the sampling variance not its square root, still less the ...
mdewey's user avatar
  • 17.7k
5 votes

Do 95% Confidence Invervals use +- 1.96 standard error or standard deviation?

The formula for a 95% CI based on the a normal distribution is: $\mu \pm 1.96 \times se$ = $\mu \pm 1.96 \times \frac{sd}{\sqrt{n}}$, so you can use the standard error (se) or calculate the standard ...
Mathemagician777's user avatar
11 votes

Do 95% Confidence Invervals use +- 1.96 standard error or standard deviation?

A standard deviation (SD) quantifies variability among a set of values. A standard error (SE) quantifies the precision of a parameter you estimated by a statistical calculation. The parameter could be ...
Harvey Motulsky's user avatar

Top 50 recent answers are included